Garbage patches like this one in Hanauma Bay, Hawaii, can be found around the planet, often made up of microscopic plastic invisible to the human eye. A new University of Miami study has found a better way to track their movement.
Garbage patches like this one in Hanauma Bay, Hawaii, can be found around the planet, often made up of microscopic plastic invisible to the human eye. A new University of Miami study has found a better way to track their movement. NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center AP
Garbage patches like this one in Hanauma Bay, Hawaii, can be found around the planet, often made up of microscopic plastic invisible to the human eye. A new University of Miami study has found a better way to track their movement. NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center AP

The ocean is full of plastic. Now UM oceanographers have a better way to find it

February 17, 2017 6:30 AM

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