A small herd of Key deer feed on grass along a road near the No Name Pub on No Name Key. Since about August, about 135 endangered Key deer have been killed by an infection of New World screwworm, a fly that lays its eggs in the open wounds of warm-blooded animals so larvae can feed off the tissue.
A small herd of Key deer feed on grass along a road near the No Name Pub on No Name Key. Since about August, about 135 endangered Key deer have been killed by an infection of New World screwworm, a fly that lays its eggs in the open wounds of warm-blooded animals so larvae can feed off the tissue. Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald.com
A small herd of Key deer feed on grass along a road near the No Name Pub on No Name Key. Since about August, about 135 endangered Key deer have been killed by an infection of New World screwworm, a fly that lays its eggs in the open wounds of warm-blooded animals so larvae can feed off the tissue. Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald.com

Sterile screwworms to be released on Florida mainland in effort to prevent outbreak

January 11, 2017 6:07 PM