Barrie Page Hill, right, shares a moment with her mother Bobbie Wilburn, 79, in Arlington, Texas. Wilburn, who developed Alzheimer’s disease, moved in with Hill.
Barrie Page Hill, right, shares a moment with her mother Bobbie Wilburn, 79, in Arlington, Texas. Wilburn, who developed Alzheimer’s disease, moved in with Hill. Joyce Marshall TNS
Barrie Page Hill, right, shares a moment with her mother Bobbie Wilburn, 79, in Arlington, Texas. Wilburn, who developed Alzheimer’s disease, moved in with Hill. Joyce Marshall TNS

Tips from experts for interacting with Alzheimer's patients

January 23, 2017 04:48 PM

More Videos

  • It's only temporary - smartphone blindness

    Smartphone habits may force doctors to ask patients a few more questions when diagnosing vision or neurological problems. “I think if a person experiences a temporary loss of vision in one eye, that’s potentially a very important problem for which they should seek medical attention,” says Mayo Clinic neurologist Dr. Dean Wingerchuk. “But, it doesn’t always mean there’s an abnormality.”