Arts & Culture

Arts & Culture

Grisham’s latest is a caper about bungling book thieves

As a diversion, perhaps, from his serious legal thrillers, John Grisham has written a delightfully lighthearted caper novel dealing with black market rare books and stolen manuscripts. The first chapter of “Camino Island,” 37 pages long, is called “The Heist.” On its own, this segment is a brilliant, step-by-step description of what seems to be a perfect crime: burglarizing the most secret, well-protected vault of Princeton University’s library to obtain five priceless handwritten manuscripts that comprise the entire literary opus of F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Arts & Culture

The complex Thomas Jefferson in his place and time

In the spring of 1962, John F. Kennedy held a dinner at the White House for Nobel Prize laureates from nations of the Western Hemisphere. Opening his remarks, he rather famously said, “I think this is the most extraordinary collection of talent, of human knowledge, that has ever been gathered together at the White House, with the possible exception of when Thomas Jefferson dined alone.” Quite less famously, he continued, “Someone once said that Thomas Jefferson was a gentleman of 32 who could calculate an eclipse, survey an estate, tie an artery, plan an edifice, try a cause, break a horse, and dance the minuet.”

Sarasota Ballet presents Christopher Wheeldon's 'The American'

The Sarasota Ballet and director Iain Webb present Christopher Wheeldon's 'The American'