In appreciation for Herald writer's music commentary

June 3, 2014 

ENTER PAGEPLANT 1 LX

KRT ENTERTAINMENT STORY SLUGGED: PAGEPLANT KRT PHOTOGRAPH BY MARK CONELISON/LEXINGTON HERALD-LEADER (KRT116) NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE June 2 - Robert Plant along with guitarist Jimmy Page perform a mix of Led Zeppelin and new material for a packed house in the Nashville Arena in Nashville Tennessee, on Tuesday June 2,1998. (LX) AP,PL,KD (smd31627) 1998 (COLOR)

MARK CONELISON — KRT

It was a pleasure to read Herald entertainment writer Marty Clear's "Outrage over Led Zeppelin lawsuit is disingenuous" column (Arts and Entertainment, May 25).

Having played in rock and roll bands for the better part of my adult life, it was refreshing to see an article in the Herald that removes us from the politics-driven divisiveness/inanity that so often seems to drive our current discourse in the press.

I must, however, correct Marty on one point in his otherwise excellent article: George Harrison's "My Sweet Lord" (1970) was actually settled in court years after the fact for his subliminally plagiarizing The Chiffon's "He's So Fine" ... not, as stated, the Carole King-Gerry Goffin tune "One Fine Day."

That aside, I appreciated the fact that he called out '80s blues-turned-glam-metal band Whitesnake and their blatantly derivative song "Still of the Night" for lifting the intro from Led Zeppelin's "Immigrant Song" -- which, by the way, also cleverly and near simultaneously inverted the riff from Zep's "Black Dog" and later incorporated bits from "Whole Lotta Love" and "Kashmir" during the song's middle section.

(All the while fitting, of course, since Zeppelin themselves were masters of regeneration from the blues legends they themselves emulated during the initial years of their own career.)

What comes around goes around, right?

Lance Abbring

Bradenton

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