Lunar eclipse coming early Tuesday

Posted by MARC R. MASFERRER on April 14, 2014 

Lunar Eclipse

FILE - This combination of Saturday, Dec. 10, 2011 photos shows the different stages of the moon during a lunar eclipse as seen from the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles. On Tuesday morning, April 15, 2014, the moon will be eclipsed by Earth's shadow and will be visible across the Western Hemisphere. The total phase will last 78 minutes. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)

RINGO H.W. CHIU — AP

From Bay News 9

Early Tuesday morning, the moon will be eclipsed by Earth's shadow.

This eclipse is the first in a series called a lunar tetrad.

A tetrad is four successive total lunar eclipses, with no partial lunar eclipses in between, each of which is separated from the other by six lunar months (six full moons).

This week’s total lunar eclipse will be visible all across the Western Hemisphere. The full eclipse phase will last 78 minutes, beginning at 3:06 a.m. EDT and ending at 4:24 a.m. EDT.

Even though the moon is in the Earth's shadow, it should appear a bit colorful, some shade of red or orange. The full moon nearly always appears coppery red during a total lunar eclipse. That’s because the dispersed light from all the Earth’s sunrises and sunsets falls on the face of the moon at mid-eclipse.

The next total lunar eclipse will be on Oct. 8.

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