Too many children denied access to their fathers

June 15, 2013 

Father's Day is tough on dads without visitation rights. As we all look forward to this Father's Day, the best gift any woman could give to a father is the acknowledgment of the irreplaceable value men and fathers bring to a relationship, to children and what they afford the greater society.

What an abject tragedy, what a horrific loss it is for any child to endure a life apart from their father.

The last 30-plus years have unfortunately not been kind to fathers and more importantly their children. It is today an unfortunate fact that of the approximate 70 million fathers in the U.S., 35 million are divorced.

Of those 35 million fathers, as a result of an anti-family court system, approximately 84.4 percent have been relegated to the status of non-custodial parent. Family courts are wrong: I have not seen my child in over two years.

It is not fathers "abandoning" their children, it's feminism, mothers and a biased family court system conspiring for financial gain and legal leverage to secure court orders denying fathers their rights to their children and children their rights to their father.

If you want fathers to act more like fathers, get government out of the way, stop policies that encourage extended court litigation, bogus restraining orders and willful violations of visitations by the custodial parent with no consequences.

There exists today no greater single threat to the long-term well-being of children, our communities, or our nation than the increasing number of children being raised without a committed, responsible, and loving father.

Fatherlessness is a growing problem America. Whether caused by divorce and broken families, or by deliberate single parenting, more and more children grow up without fathers. Indeed, 85 percent of single parent families are fatherless families.

Glen Gibellina

Sarasota

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