State: More than 1,300 Manatee teachers were 'highly effective' in 2011-12

Miami HeraldDecember 5, 2012 

The state’s Department of Education released its first report on new, controversial evaluations for teachers Wednesday.

The test score-driven evaluations -- dubbed “value-added” -- were mandated by the Florida Legislature last year and combine traditional observations with student scores and other data.

The new evaluations rate teachers if they are highly effective, effective, need improvement, developing or unsatisfactory for the 2011-12 school year.

Among teachers evaluated with new data-driven formula, 22 percent were ranked highly effective; 75 percent were rated effective and barely 2 percent were told they need improvement. About a quarter of Florida teachers were not included, according to the report.

The report for Manatee's classroom teachers:

• 1,338 teachers were ranked “highly effective”

• 1,418 teachers received “effective”

• 25 instructors got “needs improvement”

• 38 novice teachers were ranked “developing.”

• 2 teachers were ranked as "unsatisfactory."

• 528 teachers were "not evaluated."

The report also breaks down the data by campus.

By 2014, the new data-driven evaluations will be tied to tenure and salary. Teachers with several years of poor evaluations may be let go.

Teachers get a “value-added” score, which counts for half of their professional grade. That is calculated by a complicated, statistical formula, which is supposed to factor several years of test scores and other data related to a teacher’s classroom, school and students.

The measure has been extremely controversial and the state teachers union, the Florida Educators Association, pressed Gov. Rick Scott to suspend the new evaluations, saying it’s not ready for “prime time.”

Among the state union’s concerns:

• There wasn’t sufficient data for the statistical formula for all teachers, since not all subjects have a standardized test.

• There were inaccuracies in the value-added scores. In a memo, Juan Copa with the DOE advised districts that a teacher’s score could include students they didn’t teach or could be missing students.

• Teachers received their evaluation many months after the school year ended.

“It clearly is a flawed process that needs much tweaking and revamping before teachers and parents can trust in the validity of the value added model,” Ford said in a letter.

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2012/12/05/3127768/florida-releases-first-report.html#storylink=cpy

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